Snuff by Chuck Palahniuk

May 23, 2008 “Snuff” by Chuck Palahniuk Reviewed by Mark LindquistSpecial to The Seattle Times. Cassie Wright is about a porn superstar in the twilight of her career who decides to go out with a bang, so to speak, by setting a world record for serial fornication on film. “Six Read more…

Rich Kids by Robert Westbrook

Sunday, July 19, 1992 “Rich Kids” by Robert Westbrooke Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Los Angeles Times Book Review You will probably not be shocked to learn that the children of rich movie-industry parents are likely to grow up spoiled, unhappy and mentally unhealthy. Robert Westbrook brings personal experience to the Read more…

Fan Mail by Ronald Munson

Monday, September 27, 1993 “Fan Mail” by Ronald Munson; Dutton $21, 309 pages Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Los Angeles Times Joan Carpenter is an anchorwoman. Her stated ambition is to be rich and famous. The Watcher is a fan. “Fan Mail” is a creepy book about their symbiotic connection. When Read more…

Pool by Ajay Sahgal

Sunday, February 13, 1994 “Pool” by Ajay Sahgal Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Los Angeles Times Book Review, Front Page “Pool” is one of the most authentic Los Angeles novels you are likely to read and the beauty of it is that not a single moment is set in L.A. Emery Read more…

Scorched Earth by Stuart Stevens

Entertainment & the Arts: February 5, 1995 ”Scorched Earth” By Stuart Stevens Reviewed by Mark LindquistSpecial to The Seattle Times War, Ernest Hemingway once observed, is the best drama. War without guns is called politics and it is – or ought to be – a close second for dramatic value. Read more…

One Night Out Stealing by Alan Duff

January 7, 1996 “One Night Out Stealing” by Alan Duff Reviewed by Mark Lindquist New York Times Book Review In ”Pulp Fiction” and ”Get Shorty,” John Travolta defines the current pop culture image for hoods: hip, clever if not bright, and effortlessly charming. The hoods — or ”crims” — in Read more…

The Clinic by Jonathan Kellerman

February 23, 1997 “The Clinic” by Jonathan Kellerman Reviewed by Mark LindquistNew York Times Book Review This is the 11th novel in a series featuring Alex Delaware, a psychologist who solves crimes simply by being smart. He also chats with a lot of interesting people. The plot in this latest Read more…

Music for Torching by A.M. Homes

Entertainment News: Thursday, May 20, 1999 “Music for Torching” by A.M. Homes Reviewed by Mark LindquistSpecial to The Seattle Times A.M. Homes’ fifth book is daring, original, smart and artful, yet does not quite work as a novel. Paul and Elaine, the lead couple, were first featured in Homes’ short Read more…

Soft Maniacs by Maggie Estep

Entertainment News: Sunday, November 21, 1999 “Soft Maniacs” by Maggie Estep  Reviewed by Mark LindquistSpecial to The Seattle Times If you like your fiction dark, demented and highly sexed, this book is for you. You may even remember author Magge Estep as the videogenic gamin on MTV’s “Poetry Unplugged,” circa Read more…

Phoenix: A Brother’s Life by J.D. Dolan

Arts & Entertainment: March 14, 2000 “Phoenix: A Brother’s Life” by J.D. Dolan Reviewed by Mark LindquistSpecial to The Seattle Times The memoir has become our most abused genre and, mercifully, seemed to have recently reached its high water mark with “A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius,” Dave Eggers’ smart-alecky Read more…

War Boy by Kief Hillsbery

Arts & Entertainment: Sunday, June 25, 2000 “War Boy” by Kief Hillsbery  Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Special to The Seattle Times This energetic and ambitious first novel is narrated by Radboy, a 14-year-old deaf skateboard punk. “Storytellers lie,” he warns us right away, then proceeds to tell as much truth Read more…

Ready, Okay! by Adam Cadre

Arts & Entertainment: Sunday, October 15, 2000 “Ready, Okay!” by Adam Cadre  Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Special to The Seattle Times Someone had to do this. Ever since the Columbine High tragedy, I have been waiting for an author brave enough or shameless enough to write an adolescent novel that Read more…

Glue by Irvine Welsh

Arts & Entertainment: Sunday, June 10, 2001 “Glue” by Irvine Welsh Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Special to The Seattle Times Irvine Welsh is best known to the mainstream as the man who wrote the novel that the movie “Trainspotting” was based on. In the “rave” culture, he is revered as Read more…

Heavier Than Heaven by Charles Cross

Arts & Entertainment: August 16, 2001 “Heavier Than Heaven” by Charles Cross Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Special to The Seattle Times Rock biographies became a publishing phenomenon after “No One Here Gets Out Alive,” the Jim Morrison biography, became a New York Times best seller in 1980. For those of Read more…

How to Be Good by Nick Hornby

July 28, 2001 “How to Be Good,” by Nick Hornby  Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Special to the Hartford Courant Fans of Nick Hornby’s first novel, the decidedly hip and male “High Fidelity,” initially may be perplexed as to why Hornby is now writing about humdrum grown-ups from a female point Read more…

Lullaby by Chuck Palahnuik

Entertainment & the Arts, Sunday, October 6, 2002 “Lullaby” by Chuck Palahniuk Reviewed by Mark LindquistSpecial to The Seattle Times Ranting against consumerism and all the noise of the material world may seem passe, but what doesn’t these days?  Chuck Palahniuk’s novels are here to say that alienation and despair Read more…

Porno by Irvine Welsh

Entertainment & the Arts, October 17, 2002 “Porno” by Irvine Welsh Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Special to The Seattle Times Irvine Welsh’s first novel, “Trainspotting,” was an international best seller and a cult-classic movie. His witty twisted take on the youth culture of Edinburgh was daring and original. Sales have Read more…

Still Holding by Bruce Wagner

Entertainment & the Arts: Sunday, December 28, 2003 “Still Holding” by Bruce Wagner Reviewed by Mark LindquistSpecial to The Seattle Times How much hypocrisy, insanity, neediness, dysfunction and delusion can an author stuff into a novel of just under 300 pages? If the author is Bruce Wagner and the subject Read more…

The Disappointment Artist by Jonathan Lethem

Entertainment & the Arts: Sunday, March 27, 2005 “The Disappointment Artist” by Jonathan Lethem Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Special to The Seattle Times “These confessions have started to bore me,” Jonathan Lethem writes toward the end of “The Disappointment Artist,” a memoir thinly disguised as a collection of pop-culture essays. Read more…

Ten Days in the Hills by Jane Smiley

Entertainment & Arts: Friday, February 16, 2007 “Ten Days in the Hills” by Jane Smiley Reviewed by Mark Lindquist Special to The Seattle Times Hollywood has bedeviled novelists since its inception. Jane Smiley, a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, is yet another example. Smiley’s strengths are many, she is smart, insightful, observant, Read more…